THE PROBLEMS OF CARDING: Excising the Discriminatory Police Street Check Process

Over at Academia.edu, I have posted an updated public policy analysis of the police practice of carding, also known as “street checks.”

The full paper can be found HERE.

But here is the Executive Summary:

This policy analysis paper examines three options to deal with the discriminatory disproportionate number of police interactions experienced by people of colour, specifically Black people, in Ontario. I contend that random street checks by police cannot be proven to be an effective crime prevention tool and therefore should be banned. I further contend that the current regulation fashioned by Ontario’s provincial government to eliminate street checks does not go far enough to protect members of racialized groups made vulnerable by police officers conducting street checks under the auspices of official investigations.

I argue that the province must eliminate the language ambiguities in its current regulation, which, if left unaltered, will arguably continue to allow police officers to conduct street checks disproportionately on racialized people based on imprecise information. The province also must enforce the ban on random street checks and analyze future statistical data provided by police forces about their interactions with members of the public to ensure discriminatory targeting is not present. If discrimination is found, the province must permit police services to immediately suspend the offending police officers without pay. All data collected via the street check process thus far must be destroyed.

It’s extremely important that something this discriminatory practice end. These are my suggestions.

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